The Truth About Smartwatch and How it Affects Us

The Truth About Smartwatch and How it Affects Us

A lot of electronics companies seem to like a pack of overcaffeinated lemmings. They all bolt as a herd, en masse, without realizing that nobody is leading them.

That’s why the industry keeps spending so many billions on tech products that nobody buys. We were supposed to want to surf the Web on our TV sets. We were supposed to want our refrigerators connected to the Internet. Apparently “if you build it, they will come” doesn’t always apply to gadgets. So that leads us to smartwatches. Wearable technology. But the million-dollar question was asked, “how can we benefit from it?”

How Smartwatches Affects Us

Well, it already is affecting us. The way you depend on a smartwatch to track your running speed, to read voice mails and to buzz you of a notification. You never know it just yet, but it is already happening to you. While smartwatches certainly do have some benefits for users. They also have a hidden, darker side that the companies selling them are unlikely to talk about.

So here are a few things about how smartwatch affects us.

Compulsive checking

We found that heavy smartwatch users valued how the devices helped them track information as it arrived while still appearing socially attentive. It also saved users the hassle of having to dig through their pockets or handbags to find a buzzing phone. So as an alternative, why not try to read some of best Garmin watch.

Keeping track

The Apple Watch, like most wearables, is essentially a tracking device, recording heart rate, sleep patterns, movement, whereabouts, and much more depending on the apps installed. All this is packaged and transmitted to data centers for analysis.

As well as sucking up personal information, wearables could fuel an unhealthy obsession with personal wellness.

Information obsession

As we pay more attention to our feed of personal biodata, we’re likely to become more anxious about things that we may never have given a second thought to in the past.  As a result, we pour more attention into monitoring and controlling ourselves, giving us less time to do the things which actually make us happy.

 

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