Thousand-Year Old Viking Jewelry Discovered in the Isle of Man

Thousand-Year Old Viking Jewelry Discovered in the Isle of Man

Last December, a retired female police officer in the Isle of Man, discovered a stash of Viking jewelry believed to have been buried over a thousand years ago. It was the period when the Scandinavian Kings of Dublin ruled the area, denoting that the artefacts discovered by retired officer Kath Giles dates as far back as 950 AD. Among the objects that Ms. Giles, found while exploring with  a metal detector, is a large silver brooch, a silver armband, and a gold arm-ring.

According to Allison Fox, a curator at Manx National Heritage, the collection of artifacts is likely from an era when the area was a significant economic and trading zone during the AD 950. Historically, it was also the time when Norse and Viking influence became prominent for until the next 300 years.

Ms. Fox described the artifacts discovered as ornaments for people with high status and it is possible that it was hidden during an invasion. She added the fact that since the jewelries were buried together, it meant the owner was in a hurry and in a dangerous predicament if found in possession of such articles. The golden arm-ring was the rarest, since items made of gold were not common during the period if compared to silver ornaments.

Manx National Heritage the 1000-Year Old Jewelry Pieces as Government Treasure

Manx National Heritage Trust has declared the artifacts as treasures that belong to the government. Nonetheless, Kath Giles, will receive a finder’s fee as compensation. Currently, the value of the objects are still being appraised as the value will be the basis for determining Ms. Giles’ reward for unearthing the artifacts.

In the meantime, the exact location of where Ms. Giles discovered the artifacts has not been disclosed in order to maintain the integrity of the site. As of now, the ornaments are on display in the Manx Museum but will soon be removed for conservation work.

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